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Key Dates

Application Open:
Jun 17, 2019
Application Close:
Sep 6, 2019
Session Start:
Jan 21, 2020
Session End:
Apr 10, 2020

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CONTACT US

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
Christine Mirzayan
Science & Technology Policy
Graduate Fellowship Program
Washington, DC 20001
Phone: 202-334-2455
Email:   policyfellows@nas.edu
The Christine Mirzayan Science & Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship Program

The Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology
Policy Graduate Fellowship Program
We are pleased to announce the fellows for the 2020 Mirzayan fellowship class. Meet the new class.

The Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship Program is a full-time hands-on training and educational program that provides early career individuals with the opportunity to spend 12 weeks at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Washington, DC learning about science and technology policy and the role that scientists and engineers play in advising the nation. This Mirzayan Fellowship offers a unique opportunity to obtain the essential skills and knowledge needed to work in science policy at the federal, state, or local levels.

For more details,


Staff

Gail Cohen, Director
E-mail: gcohen@nas.edu | Voice: 202-334-2253 | Fax: 202-334-2530

If you have any questions, please contact us at policyfellows@nas.edu.

About the Program

The Christine Mirzayan Science & Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship Program, now in its 22nd year, is a full-time hands-on training and educational program that provides early career individuals with the opportunity to spend 12 weeks at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Washington, DC learning about science and technology policy and the role that scientists and engineers play in advising the nation.

Each year, applicants from around the world become part of an Academies' unit where they are assigned to a mentor and learn about the world of science and technology policy. An immersive experience, the program is designed to broaden fellows' appreciation of employment opportunities outside academia and leave them with both a firm grasp of the important and dynamic role of science and technology in decision-making and a better understanding of the role that they can play in strengthening the science and technology enterprise for the betterment of mankind.

Alumni of the program hold positions in Congressional committees such as the House Science and Technology Committee and at federal agencies such as the U.S. Department of State, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Environmental Protection Agency, United States Agency for International Development, Department of Defense, and Department of Energy. They also work in foreign governments, in international institutions such as the European Union and World Bank, in universities, and in the private sector.

Purpose of the Program


The fellowship program, which operates under the auspices of the Policy and Global Affairs Division, a program unit within the Academies, is designed to engage early career professionals in the analytical processes that inform U.S. science and technology policy. Fellows obtain the essential skills and knowledge needed to work in science policy at the federal, state, or local levels.

What to Expect


During the program, fellows engage in studies and activities throughout the Academies. Examples of former fellows' projects include:

  • Outlining themes related to leading research in remote sensing applications;
  • A workshop on how scientists in developing countries might take better advantage of new wireless communication networks to gain access to the Internet;
  • A workshop on the ethical, legal, and societal issues associated with the emerging field of synthetic biology;
  • A background paper on the state of knowledge of the demography of street-children and the cost and effectiveness of existing programs that help street-children and orphans in the U.S. and abroad;
  • A concept paper exploring the status of the global research university.

Each fellow is assigned to a senior staff member who acts as his or her mentor. The mentor provides guidance and ensures that the fellow's time is focused on substantive projects and activities within the fellow's assigned unit.

During the first week of the fellowship program, fellows spend their mornings in Orientation learning about how the Academies operate and gaining an understanding of the fundamentals of science and technology policy. After the first week at Mirzayan, fellows receive briefings from representatives of other organizations in Washington, DC that influence, make, or report on science and technology policy.

Throughout the fellowship program, fellows are assigned to small groups that research specific science and technology policy topics. Each group presents their findings to the full fellowship class. Through this exercise, fellows gain a better understanding of committee dynamics in an environment that is similar to that of the Academies' committees. In the process, fellows gain insights into the challenges inherent in arranging presentations of the type that would be made before a congressional or Academies' committee.

During the first week of the fellowship program, fellows spend their mornings in getting accustomed to the Academies at our Program Orientation were they learn how the Academies operate and gain an understanding of the fundamentals of science and technology policy. After the first week at Mirzayan, fellows receive briefings from representatives of other organizations in Washington, DC that influence, make, or report on science and technology policy.

About Christine Mirzayan


Christine Mirzayan was a Fellow in the second year of the Policy Fellowship Program and was assigned to the Center for Education. She had recently finished her PhD from the University of California in San Francisco and had been selected as a 1998 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Congressional fellow.

At UCSF, her research focused on the development of the vertebrate nervous system. In particular, she analyzed the molecular mechanism by which diffusible cues guide the migration of developing axons. While at UCSF, she found that although she enjoyed basic research, she was increasingly interested in the role that science plays in society and looked forward to a career that would allow her to utilize her scientific knowledge to address the political and social problems facing our nation.

Tragically, she was unable to reach that goal when she lost her life during the last week of the fellowship program. The National Academy of Sciences has named the program in her honor.

To learn more about Christine Mirzayan, please visit these sites:

Christine Mirzayan Memorial Fund

CHRISTINE MIRZAYAN MEMORIAL FUND

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES
2101 CONSTITUTION AVENUE
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20418

Resolution of the Council of the National Academy of Sciences


It is with great sadness that the Council of the National Academy of Sciences acknowledges the tragic, untimely death of Dr. Christine Mirzayan.

The Academy community was fortunate to know Christine, one of our outstanding summer interns. An outstanding young scientist, Christine came to the Academy with plans for bringing the excitement of science to the public at large by improving the way students at the K-12 level are educated. Her work at the Academy set her on a path toward pursuing this goal.

She wanted to make the world a better place. To this end, the Council has established a memorial fund to honor her memory, her initiative, drive and spirit, so that others might have the opportunity to make contributions toward the betterment of society, as Christine so hoped to do. The fund will be dedicated toward activities that link science to public policy, particularly in the area of science education policy.

Adopted by the Council of the National Academy of Sciences at its meeting in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, August 11, 1998.


The National Academy of Sciences has established the Christine Mirzayan Memorial Fund to celebrate Christine's love of life, enthusiasm for science, intelligence and high aspirations for contributing to human welfare.

While Christine was in Washington, she participated in the second year of our summer fellowship program (formerly internship program) for graduate and postdoctoral science and engineering students. She embodied the type of individual the NAS was thinking of when the program was established. An individual interested not just in scientific research as an end to itself--but in its contribution to society as a whole. This was exemplified not only by her desire to be in Washington both in the internship program and her plans to spend the next year as a AAAS Congressional fellow, but also by her volunteer work in San Francisco public schools before coming to Washington.

Because of who she was, the Council of the National Academy of Sciences has decided to name the program in Christine's name and to use the fund to support this program. In this way, her name will be long remembered by generations of science and engineering students as they apply and participate in this program that brings students to Washington from universities throughout the country. Each will be introduced to Christine as a person, particularly her desire to make a difference in society through her science. As stated by one of the interns who served in this year's program with Christine, this is also "a way to both honor her and remember her in a positive, cheerful and busy way --- which is the way I remember Christine."

Anyone who wishes to make a donation via credit card should visit the Academy Giving page or you may send a check, made out to National Academy of Sciences/Christine Mirzayan Fund, to Gail Cohen at the address below. All gifts will be acknowledged to her family and are fully tax deductible.

Gail Cohen
Director
Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship Program
National Academy of Sciences/Christine Mirzayan Fund
500 5th Street, NW, Keck 574
Washington, DC 20001

How to Apply

Please note the following:

  • This is NOT a scholarship. This program is NOT employment, does NOT fund research, research-related activities, award scholarships, or provide financial aid assistance of any kind. A stipend is provided to offset living expenses during the fellowship period.
  • Eligibility. Graduate and professional school students and those who have completed graduate studies (degree awarded) within the last five years may apply. Areas of study may include social/behavioral sciences, health and medicine, physical or biological sciences, engineering, law/business/public administration, or relevant interdisciplinary fields. Refer to Eligibility Criteria below.
  • Reference Requirements. TWO online references must be received prior to application submission. You will NOT be able to submit your application until BOTH references have been received. References must be relevant to your academic, professional, volunteer or other related experience.
  • Even if you have applied for a fellowship in the past, you MUST complete a new application. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Application materials do not carry over from session to session.

The 2020 session of the Mirzayan Fellowship will begin on January 21 and conclude on April 10, 2020.

Eligibility Criteria


Graduate and professional school students and those who have completed graduate studies within the last five years may apply. Areas of study may include social/behavioral sciences, health and medicine, physical or biological sciences, engineering, law/business/public administration, or relevant interdisciplinary fields.

Q: Can undergraduates apply for the Program?
A: No. The program is for graduate students, postdoctoral students, and professional school students (e.g, Master's, JD, MD, PhD).

Q: Does the Fellowship Program have a citizenship requirement?
A: No. Applicants who are not US citizens or US permanent residents must hold one of the following visas:

  • F-1 Students using CPT (Curricular Practical Training)
  • F-1 Students using OPT (Optional Practical Training)
  • J-2 Dependents
  • J-1 Students using academic training
  • J-1 Research Scholars with written approval of their Responsible Officer
  • DACA recipients
  • Adjustment Applicants, Refugees, Asylees, and Selected other visa classes

Q: Am I eligible if I have temporary worker status (H-1B or TN)?
A: No. The Mirzayan Fellowship is a fellowship award, not employment by the National Academies.

Q: Do I have to live in the United States to be considered?
A: Yes. Applicants who are not US citizens or US permanent residents must already hold valid status in one of the visas listed above.

Q: Do the National Academies sponsor visas for the Fellowship Program?
A: No.

Q: Would a graduating senior who will be entering a graduate program qualify for this Program?
A: No. You must be attending a graduate or professional school or have recently graduated from a graduate or professional school.

Can I apply if I'm just past the point of being a postdoctoral fellow?
A: Yes. If you completed your graduate studies (degree awarded) within the last 5 years, you are eligible to apply.

Q: Are the social sciences considered as a "science"?
A: Yes.

Q: Can law and business students in professional programs apply?
A: Yes. Given the importance of science and technology today, students in professional schools undoubtedly benefit from exposure to science and technology policy issues.

Steps to Apply


  1. Apply using the register/login buttons at the top right of this page under "How to Apply". If you are a first time visitor, click the 'register' button. If you have applied in the past or already started your application, click Log In.
  2. Review your eligibility. This is an early career fellowship program. Graduate and professional school students and those who have completed graduate studies (degree awarded) within the last five years may apply. Areas of study may include social/behavioral sciences, health and medicine, physical or biological sciences, engineering, law/business/public administration, or relevant interdisciplinary fields.
  3. Review Prospective Units  and select up to 7 that interest you.
  4. Notify Referees. TWO references are required. These must be relevant to your academic, professional, volunteer, or other related experience. Towards the beginning of the application form, you will be asked to provide an email address for each referee. Complete this section right away to ensure that your referees have adequate time to submit their reference before the application deadline. Mailed reference letters will NOT be accepted.
  5. Review all sections of the application prior to submission.
  6. In order to submit your application successfully, you must upload ALL required materials, ensure that your recommendation letters are attached, and hit the SUBMIT button by the deadline.

IMPORTANT:

To ensure delivery of the recommendation request, you may wish to ask your referees to add policyfellows@nas.edu to their contacts, email address book, or safe senders list.

FAQs



Who are the National Academies?

Q: Are the National Academies part of a government agency?
A: No. The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) was created by the federal government to be an adviser on scientific and technological matters, but is not part of the federal government. The Academy complex now consists of four organizations collectively known as the National Academies: the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), and the National Research Council (NRC). The National Academy of Sciences was created in 1863 by a congressional charter approved by President Abraham Lincoln. Under this charter, the National Research Council was established in 1916, the National Academy of Engineering in 1964, and the Institute of Medicine in 1970.

The National Academies is a private, non-governmental organization and does not receive direct federal appropriations for its work. The majority of the studies carried out by the National Academies are conducted at the request of government agencies. However, many studies are privately funded [Learn more}.


The Fellowship Program

Q: Why is a fellowship program needed?
A: Scientists and engineers with PhDs and other advanced degrees play a central and growing role in American industrial and commercial life. We increasingly depend on people with advanced scientific and technological knowledge in collective efforts to develop new technologies and industries, reduce environmental pollution, combat disease and hunger, develop new sources of energy, and maintain competitiveness. Traditional graduate education to the doctoral level, organized around an intensive research experience, has served as a world model for the advanced training of scientists and engineers. However, most PhDs will work outside academia. As a result, graduate students in science, engineering, and related disciplines need to broaden their professional experience.

Q: Where does the fellowship program take place?
A: The fellowship will take place in Washington, D.C. at one of the National Academies' facilities. In general, fellows will work at the Keck Center, 500 5th Street, NW in downtown Washington, D.C. Fellows may also work at the National Academy of Sciences Building, 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW on the National Mall.

Q: How competitive is the program?
A: The program is very competitive. In general, less than 10% of applicants are selected for fellowships.

Q: When is the application deadline?
A: Applications for a session are due the fall before the session begins.

Q: Can I do a shortened fellowship?
A: No. Fellows must complete the full 12-week term and be available to start their fellowship on the first scheduled day of orientation. Any request for scheduled leave (personal or professional) during the term of the fellowship must be approved prior to acceptance to the fellowship program.

Applying for a Fellowship

Q: Are these fellowships available every year?
A: The program has been funded to hold one session each year for the next five years beginning in January 2019.

Is graduate work experience considered work?
A: No. Graduate work such as working as a Teaching Assistant or Research Assistant is part of your graduate education and is not considered work experience for the purpose of the fellowship application.

Q: How many references do I need?
A: TWO online references are required to complete the application process. References must be relevant to your academic, professional, volunteer or other related experience. You will NOT be able to submit your application until BOTH references have been received. Mailed reference letters will NOT be accepted.

Q: How will my referees be notified?
Once you complete the reference section of the application and provide your referees’ contact information, an automated email request will be sent to each referee. Be sure to provide your referees with as much time as possible to ensure that their reference is submitted before the application deadline.

Alert your referees that they will receive an automated "Information Request" email from Scholar Select/Mirzayan S&T Policy Fellowship Program. This email will contain a unique link to a recommendation form to be completed on your behalf. An email confirmation will be sent to you when a reference has been received. To ensure delivery of the reference request, you may wish to ask your referees to add automated.email@scholarselect.com to their contacts, email address book, or safe senders list.

Q: Can I reapply for the program?
A: Yes. However, if you have applied for a fellowship in the past, you must complete a new application. Application materials do not carry over from session to session.

Q: When will the prospective candidates be informed of their acceptance?
A: Candidates selected for interviews are generally notified within three to six weeks of the application deadline. Unsuccessful applicants will be notified when the selection process is complete (approximately two months after the application deadline).

Funding

Q: Does the fellowship program provide scholarship money or other funding for research or continuing education
A: No. This program does not fund research, award scholarships, or provide financial aid assistance of any kind. If you are awarded a fellowship, a stipend is provided to offset expenses during the fellowship period.

Q: Is this program considered employment?
A: No.

What is the amount of the stipend?
A: For the 2020 session, the stipend for the 12-week program is $9,250. The fellowship stipend is provided to offset living expenses during the fellowship period.

Q: When do I receive my stipend if I am accepted to the program?
A: The stipend is paid out in one installment during the first week of the program.

Q: Do I receive travel expenses?
A: No.

Unit Selection

Q: What opportunities can I pursue as part of the Fellowship Program?
A: Please see the Prospective Units for a listing of all the program units that may be accepting fellows. Look at the web page for each unit to gain an understanding unit activities and active studies.

Q: Will all units participate each session?
A: No. All units may not participate during each session, and there is no way to know in advance which units are accepting fellows. You may apply for up to 7, and we strongly encourage you to select the maximum number. Please see the Prospective Units for a listing of all the program units that may be accepting fellows. Look at the web page for each unit to gain an understanding unit activities and active studies.

Q: Will the fellowship be in my particular area of expertise (e.g., molecular biology, cultural anthropology in Africa, etc.)?
A: Not necessarily. While we try to place fellows in the units of their choice, the purpose of this fellowship program is to broaden the fellow's experience. A prospective applicant should not apply for the program if they are only willing to work in their field of study. Additionally, although we do our best to determine what activities/projects will be active during the fellowship, these may change even in the few months between your interview and the fellowship. If you are interested in only working in a very specific policy area, then this fellowship is not the right one for you. You may be asked to work on any science and technology policy issue.

Once Selected

Q: Where can I find more information about housing during the fellowship?
A: Fellows are responsible for obtaining housing during the fellowship period. Program alumni suggest searching Craigslist for housing opportunities. In addition, many universities in Washington, DC, Virginia, and Maryland offer suggestions for off-campus housing. Program alumni recommend visiting the Georgetown University, George Washington University, and American University web sites.

Q: What if I can't attend the entire orientation program and need to miss a day?
A: Acceptance to the program is contingent upon attending orientation in its entirety.

Prospective Units

All units may not participate during each session. There is no way to know in advance which units will be accepting fellows. Review the former fellows list to see which units have accepted fellows recently. Applicants may apply for up to seven units, and we strongly encourage selecting the maximum number.

download [Download printer-friendly alphabetical list of prospective units]

Division on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (DBASSE) Division Website
Participating Units within DBASSE:

Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences (BBCSS)
Board on Children, Youth, and Families (BCYF) Joint with Health and Medicine Division
Board on Environmental Change and Society (BECS) 
Board on Human-Systems Integration (BOHSI)
Board on Science Education (BOSE)
Board on Testing and Assessment (BOTA)
Committee on Law and Justice (CLAJ)
Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT)
Committee on Population (CPOP)
Division on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education Executive Office (DBASSE EO)

Division on Earth and Life Studies (DELS) Division Website
Participating Units within DELS:

Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources (BANR)
Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (BASC)
Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology (BCST)
Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (BESR)
Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology (BEST)
Board on Life Sciences (BLS)
Division of Earth and Life Studies Executive Office (DELS EO)
Institute for Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR)
Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board (NRSB)
Ocean Studies Board (OSB)
Polar Research Board (PRB)
Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB)

Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences (DEPS) Division Website
Participating Units within DEPS:

Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB)
Air Force Studies Board (AFSB)
Board on Army Research and Development (BOARD)
Board on Energy and Environmental Systems (BEES)
Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment (BICE)
Board on Mathematical Sciences and Analytics (BMSA)
Board on Physics and Astronomy (BPA)
Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB)
Intelligence Community Studies Board (ICSB)
Laboratory Assessments Board (LAB)
National Materials and Manufacturing Board (NMMB)
Naval Studies Board (NSB)
Space Studies Board (SSB) 

Health and Medicine Division (HMD) Division Website
Participating Units within HMD:

Board on Children, Youth, and Families (BCYF) Joint with Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education
Board on Global Health (BGH)
Board on Health Care Services (HCS)
Board on Health Sciences Policy (HSP)
Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice (BPH) 
Board on the Health of Select Populations (BSP) 
Food and Nutrition Board (FNB)

National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Division Website
Participating Units within NAE: 

Center for Engineering Ethics and Society
EngineerGirl 
Executive Office
Grand Challenges for Engineering
Manufacturing, Design and Innovation
K-12 Engineering Education

Policy and Global Affairs Division (PGA) Division Website
Participating Units within PGA:

Board on Higher Education and the Workforce (BHEW)
Board on International Scientific Organizations (BISO)
Board on Science, Technology and Economic Policy (STEP)
Board on Research Data and Information (BRDI)
Committee on Human Rights (CHR)
Committee on International Security and Arms Control (CISAC)
Committee on Science, Engineering, Medicine and Public Policy (COSEMPUP)
Committee on Science, Technology and Law (CSTL)
Committee on Women in Science, Engineering and Medicine (CWSEM)
Development, Security and Cooperation (DSC)
Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable (GUIRR)
InterAcademy Partnership for Research
Resilient America Roundtable

Science and Technology for Sustainability Program (STS)

Transportation Research Board (TRB) Division Website 
 Participating Units within TRB:

Cooperative Research Programs (CRP)
Studies and Special Programs Division
Technical Activities Division

Other activities of the National Academy of Sciences
Participating Units:

Cultural Programs of the NAS (CPNAS) 
LabX
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)
Gulf Research Program

Current and Past Fellows

2019 Fellows

View the 2019 Biographical Sketches pdf  (630kb)

2019 Fellows

2018 Fellows

View the 2018 Biographical Sketches pdf  (725kb)

2018 Fellows

2017 Fellows

View the 2017 Biographical Sketches pdf  (446kb)

2017 Fellows

2016 Fellows

View the 2016 Biographical Sketches pdf  (373kb)

2016 Fellows

2015 Fellows

View the 2015 Biographical Sketches pdf  (226kb)

2015 Fellows

2014 Fellows

View the 2014 Biographical Sketches pdf  (291kb)

2014 Fellows

2012 Fall Fellows

View the 2012 Fall Biographical Sketches pdf  (366kb)

2012 Fall Fellows

2012 Winter Fellows

View the 2012 Winter Biographical Sketches pdf  (293kb)

2012 Winter Fellows

2011 Fall Fellows

View the 2011 Fall Biographical Sketches pdf  (441kb)

2010 Fall Fellows

2011 Winter Fellows

View the 2011 Winter Biographical Sketches pdf  (405kb)

2011 Winter Fellows

2010 Fall Biographical Sketches pdf  (372kb)
2010 Winter Biographical Sketches pdf  (466kb)
2009 Fall Biographical Sketches pdf  (100k)
2009 Winter Biographical Sketches pdf  (245kb)
2008 Fall Biographical Sketches pdf  (228kb)
2008 Winter Biographical Sketches pdf  (237kb)
2007 Summer Biographical Sketches pdf  (348kb)
2007 Fall Biographical Sketches pdf  (348kb)
2007 Winter Biographical Sketches pdf  (426kb)
2006 Summer Biographical Sketches pdf  (278kb)
2006 Fall Biographical Sketches pdf  (209kb)
2006 Winter Biographical Sketches pdf  (224kb)
2005 Summer Biographical Sketches pdf  (230kb)
2005 Fall Biographical Sketches pdf  (321kb)
2005 Winter Biographical Sketches pdf  (158kb)
2004 Summer Biographical Sketches pdf  (127kb)
2004 Fall Biographical Sketches pdf  (108kb)
2004 Winter Biographical Sketches pdf  (100k)

2003 Summer Biographical Sketches pdf  (131kb)
2003 Fall Biographical Sketches pdf  (502kb)
2003 Winter Biographical Sketches pdf  (275kb)
2002 Summer Biographical Sketches pdf  (432kb)
2002 Fall Biographical Sketches pdf  (291kb)
2002 Winter Biographical Sketches pdf  (225kb)
2001 Summer Biographical Sketches pdf  (400kb)
2001 Winter Biographical Sketches pdf  (319kb)
2000 Summer Biographical Sketches pdf  (402kb)
2000 Winter Biographical Sketches pdf  (334kb)
1999 Biographical Sketches pdf  (524kb)
1998 Biographical Sketches pdf  (346kb)
1997 Biographical Sketches pdf  (311kb)

What the Fellows Say

  • Irene Cheng (2019) - "The Mirzayan Fellowship is a training opportunity like no other. Fellows are challenged to ask questions, try new projects in new fields, push boundaries, and meet everyone in DC!"
  • Pritishma Lakhe (2019) - "I had an amazing experience as a Mirzayan Fellow. The opportunities I got to make professional connections and build relationships were beyond what I had imagined. This is a great opportunity for grad students to learn about career options beyond the traditional route!"
  • Laura P. Minero (2019) - "The Mirzayan Fellowship completely exceeded my expectations in learning about science policy alongside really intelligent and amazing people that have all become my friends. Best three months in DC ever!"
  • Becca Monteleone (2019)- "The Mirzayan Fellowship was such an incredible experience! It's a fantastic opportunity to learn more about #sciencepolicy in DC and to meet some amazing people!"
  • Melody Tan (2019) - "The Mirzayan Fellowship was by far the best opportunity I've had during my PhD and really helped focus my career goals."
  • Augusta Williams (2019) - "I cannot recommend the Mirzayan Fellowship enough. It completely changed my science, my career prospects, and my life! If you are at all interested in #scipol or learning how your #science can be translated into action, please consider applying."
  • Yasmeen Hussain (2017) - "The Mirzayan Fellowship was an amazing intro to science policy - I highly recommend applying!
  • Kellyann Jones-Jamtgaard, PhD (2017) - "Being a fellow and part of the Committee on Women in SEM was one of the best experiences I've ever had!"
  • Sarah Soliman (2009 Fall) - "This was such a crucial experience in my career development. Highly recommend & still rely heavily on the beauty of the Mirzayan Fellowship network."
  • Jay Cole, PhD (2007 Summer) - "Being a Mirzayan Fellow was transformative. Doing substantive science policy work, learning how politics really operates, meeting and interacting with exceptional peers and international experts—all in a city with endless cultural and social possibilities. Anyone looking for an amazing intellectual and professional adventure should apply to be a Mirzayan Fellow."
  • Aaron Levine (2003 Summer) - "I was a Mirzayan Fellow with @theNASciences' Board on Science, Technology and Economic Policy many years ago and highly recommend it. Excellent introduction to world of #SciencePolicy."